Migrations with Orient Express

Migration In Botswana – Come and see a spectacular show

Northern Botswana, July 2013 – Each year in November migratory birds start flying back to Southern Africa to escape the cold winter in the Northern Hemisphere. Orient Express’ camps in Northern Botswana – Eagle Island Camp, Khwai River Lodge and Savute Elephant Camp – offer some of the best locations in which to spot them.

Amongst the more exotic birds flying back are the Eurasian Steppe Eagle, the Lesser Spotted Eagle, the European Bee Eater, the European White Stork and the Woolly Neck Storks. The spring and summer afternoon thundershowers in Botswana perk up the dry barren bush and savannah, and bring a gazillion bugs and insects to life. Birds thrive on this bug-filled smorgasbord. Also at this time of the year, thousands of juicy winged termites swarm out of underground nests with just one objective in mind: to find a mate, build a nest, and eventually establish a new colony – aptly known as the “wedding flight”. And what a feast they provide for birds arriving in Southern Africa from all over the world.

In Savute the natural pans area fill up with rain water and attract a great variety of storks – many fowler’s favourite birds. Storks don’t just feast on the termites but also take full advantage of the frogs that come out to eat the termites. Eagles also enjoy termite titbits both here and in the Khwai River conservancy. But it is not only feathered animals which migrate to Northern Botswana at this time of the year. A less well-known fact is that around December the second biggest migration of zebra in the world occurs from the Linyanti through Savute and on to the Mababe Depression where they spend their time during the wet season.

This spectacular migration is becoming a much sought after attraction. The dazzling zebra herds don’t just pass through, they actually remain in the Savute area for several weeks, giving birth to their young and feeding on the sweet new grasses, before moving further on south to Mababe. These same zebra herds reappear in Savute again around March and April as they make their way back to their dry season range along the Chobe and Linyanti Rivers.

OES GAME DRIVE SAVUTE

Amongst the more exotic birds flying back are the Eurasian Steppe Eagle, the Lesser Spotted Eagle, the European Bee Eater, the European White Stork and the Woolly Neck Storks. The spring and summer afternoon thundershowers in Botswana perk up the dry barren bush and savannah, and bring a gazillion bugs and insects to life. Birds thrive on this bug-filled smorgasbord. Also at this time of the year, thousands of juicy winged termites swarm out of underground nests with just one objective in mind: to find a mate, build a nest, and eventually establish a new colony – aptly known as the “wedding flight”. And what a feast they provide for birds arriving in Southern Africa from all over the world.
In Savute the natural pans area fill up with rain water and attract a great variety of storks – many fowler’s favourite birds. Storks don’t just feast on the termites but also take full advantage of the frogs that come out to eat the termites. Eagles also enjoy termite titbits both here and in the Khwai River conservancy.

But it is not only feathered animals which migrate to Northern Botswana at this time of the year. A less well-known fact is that around December the second biggest migration of zebra in the world occurs from the Linyanti through Savute and on to the Mababe Depression where they spend their time during the wet season. This spectacular migration is becoming a much sought after attraction. The dazzling zebra herds don’t just pass through, they actually remain in the Savute area for several weeks, giving birth to their young and feeding on the sweet new grasses, before moving further on south to Mababe. These same zebra herds reappear in Savute again around March and April as they make their way back to their dry season range along the Chobe and Linyanti Rivers.

Pursuing the more than 25,000 zebra are predators and scavengers who naturally take advantage of the sheer numbers of zebras and their weak and wobbly young. They provide a fine feast for hungry hunters, and a feast for the eyes of Orient-Express Safaris’ guests.
Take advantage of Orient-Express Safaris special offers which showcase these natural wonders of Botswana on www.khwairiverlodge.com; www.savuteelephantcamp.com www.eagleislandcamp.com. Worth noting is that passionate bird watchers at Orient-Express Safaris camps will be able to scrutinise these fascinating birds – as well as the animal migration – from an even closer perspective with our high quality Zeiss binoculars.

Website E-mail